Photographers You Should Study

Robert Mapplethorpe: Facing Humanity

American Photographer

Robert Mapplethorpe

Quotes | Videos | Books

View images by: Robert Mapplethorpe

Robert Mapplethorpe – Wikipedia

Robert Mapplethorpe [1946 – 1989] was an American photographer known for his edgy and provocative portraits, nudes, and still lifes.

He began his career immersed in the New York art scene of the 1970s, collaborating with artist Patti Smith and later exploring homoeroticism and BDSM aesthetics in his photography.

His stark black-and-white images, often featuring flowers, bodybuilders, and celebrities, challenged notions of beauty and sexuality, generating both adoration and controversy.

Mapplethorpe’s meticulous compositions and masterful use of light imbued his controversial subjects with a haunting elegance, blurring the lines between art and taboo.

Despite facing censorship and backlash, his work pushed boundaries and sparked cultural conversations, securing his place as an influential figure in 20th-century photography.

Read the full Biography below.


Photography Quotes From Robert Mapplethorpe

📸 Did you know?
He started with collages, not photography. Though known for his powerful photographs, Mapplethorpe initially pursued three-dimensional collages and assemblages, incorporating found objects and photographs he didn’t take himself. This early exploration of texture and composition influenced his later photographic style.

Videos about Robert Mapplethorpe

📸 Did you know?
He collaborated closely with Patti Smith. Their artistic and romantic partnership fueled significant growth in both of their careers. Mapplethorpe photographed Smith and her band, while Smith championed his work and encouraged his artistic voice.

Photography Books: Robert Mapplethorpe

📸 Did you know?
He championed self-representation and LGBTQ+ visibility. Mapplethorpe’s work challenged conventional notions of sexuality and gender, offering powerful portrayals of LGBTQ+ individuals in his artistic vision. He empowered self-representation and contributed to greater visibility for marginalized communities.

Biography of Robert Mapplethorpe

Early Life and Education

Robert Mapplethorpe, born November 4, 1946, in Floral Park, Queens, New York, was a pivotal figure in contemporary photography. His upbringing in a strict Catholic family in suburban New York significantly shaped his artistic sensibilities and themes. 

Mapplethorpe attended the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, where he studied drawing, painting, and sculpture. During his time at Pratt, he began experimenting with various artistic forms, including photography, which would later become his primary medium.

Artistic Beginnings

Mapplethorpe’s early artistic endeavors were characterized by a fascination with materials and forms. He initially used a Polaroid camera to produce photographs for use in collages. This period was marked by his exploration of mixed media and his growing interest in photography as a standalone art form.

Photographic Career and Style

In the 1970s, Mapplethorpe’s focus shifted primarily to photography. His photographic work is known for its classical quality and often controversial subject matter. 

Mapplethorpe’s images ranged from still lifes to portraits and figure studies, including a significant body of work that explored the New York underground BDSM scene and the gay male community.

His work is characterized by its attention to detail, composition, and form. Mapplethorpe often sought to elevate subjects that were traditionally marginalized or deemed taboo by mainstream society, presenting them in a manner that combined stark realism with classical beauty.

Notable Series and Collaborations

Mapplethorpe’s portfolio includes a wide range of subjects, from flowers and celebrities to nude figures and erotic imagery. 

One of his most significant collaborations was with musician and artist Patti Smith, whom he met in 1967. Smith and Mapplethorpe shared an intense creative partnership, and he photographed her for the iconic cover of her album “Horses.”

Controversy and Impact

Mapplethorpe’s work sparked significant controversy, particularly his explicit depiction of the male body and homoerotic themes. His X Portfolio, which includes images of the BDSM scene, became the center of a national debate on public funding for the arts and the limits of artistic expression. 

Despite the controversy, or perhaps because of it, Mapplethorpe’s work played a crucial role in igniting discussions about censorship, sexuality, and artistic freedom.

Exhibitions and Recognition

Mapplethorpe’s work has been exhibited extensively in galleries and museums worldwide. His ability to push boundaries and challenge societal norms secured his reputation as a groundbreaking artist. 

His photographs are in numerous public collections, including the Guggenheim Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

Later Years and Legacy

In the later years of his life, Mapplethorpe continued to produce a prolific body of work, even as he battled AIDS. He established the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation in 1988, a year before his death, to support photography at the institutional level and fund medical research in the fight against AIDS and HIV.

Robert Mapplethorpe passed away on March 9, 1989, in Boston, Massachusetts, due to complications from AIDS. His death marked the loss of one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century.

Mapplethorpe’s legacy lies in his fearless exploration of subject matter and his mastery of the photographic medium. His work continues to be celebrated for its artistic merit and contribution to discussions about sexuality, identity, and artistic expression. 

Mapplethorpe remains a significant figure in contemporary art; his photographs are a testament to the power of photography to challenge, provoke, and inspire.


Joe Edelman

Joe Edelman is an award winning Photographer, Photo Educator and the host of The The LAST FRAME LIVE, which is viewed by photographers in over 100 countries.  Follow this link to learn more about Joe or view his portfolio.
Back to top button